Portail des Humanités Environnementales

Sustainability Fellowship at Society for the Humanities, Cornell University 26 août 2017

The Society for the Humanities together with the Atkinson’s Center invites applications for a one-year residential fellowship at Cornell University on the topic of AUTHORITY as it relates to sustainability, the environment, energy, or economic development.

Sustainability Fellowship at Society for the Humanities, Cornell University
Forwarded news from the Australian Environmental Humanities Hub's website

The following application materials must be submitted on or before OCTOBER 1, 2017.


" Jointly sponsored by the Society for the Humanities and the David R. Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future at Cornell University

The Society for the Humanities together with the Atkinson’s Center invites applications for a one-year residential fellowship at Cornell University on the topic of AUTHORITY as it relates to sustainability, the environment, energy, or economic development.

The fellowship carries a stipend of $54,000. Applicants living outside North America are eligible for an additional $2,000 to assist with travel costs.
 
Focal Theme 2018-2019: AUTHORITY

The Society for the Humanities at Cornell University seeks interdisciplinary research projects for residencies that reflect on the philosophical, aesthetic, political, legal, ecological, religious, and cultural understandings of authority.

From auctoritas to the author to authoritarianism, the question of authority – whether grounded in epistemological expertise, juridical power, rhetorical persuasiveness, creative innovation, divine decree, or political charisma – is inextricable from humanistic inquiry and critique. With authority, the power to decide, to authorize, to adjudicate, to rule, and to hold sway stands or falls – in science, law, art, oratory, religion, or politics. The Society invites scholarly projects that trace the consequences, crises, and possibilities of authority across historical periods, disciplinary boundaries, geographic territories, and social contexts.

At stake in authority is who or what authorizes and bestows power, prestige, and influence. On what basis does authority claim to rule? Knowledge? Law? Charisma? Popular will? The sovereign word? Tradition? Moreover, each expression of authority calls forth its contestation and opposition. At times authority is contested within the same discursive sphere (e.g. different scientific paradigms or hermeneutic interpretations at loggerheads); at times, however, the opposition is based on another source of authority: religious law vs. secular law; scientific knowledge vs. political will; economic concerns vs. ethical concerns. At such junctures, the question then arises: who or what power adjudicates the conflict between appeals to different authoritative instances?

The Society invites scholars to explore the ‘ends of authority,’ understood as its purposes, goals, and ideals as well as its limitations, aporias, and paradoxes. Applicants could investigate the rise of authoritarianism across different historical and political or religious contexts, exploring its conditions, its appeal, its critiques. One could research the crisis of scientific authority, in which expertise itself is called into question on grounds that are often impervious to scientific argumentation. Considering the death of the author, one could question what signs, strokes, words, tics, and idiosyncrasies determine a text’s or artwork’s ‘author’; what authorizes an original from its copy or fake; or the degree to which the authority of a few authors still determines research fields today. In the age of a superabundance of information, what differentiates ‘real’ (authoritative) information from ‘fake news,’ and how one can be interchanged with the other as an ‘equal’ source of authority?

The Society for the Humanities welcomes applications from scholars and practitioners who are interested in investigating authority from the broadest variety of international and disciplinary perspectives.
 
Qualifications:

Applicants should be working on a topic in the humanities that addresses authority as it relates to energy, the environment, or economic development. Their approach to the humanities should be broad enough to appeal to students and scholars in several humanistic disciplines. Applicants must have received the Ph.D. degree before January 1, 2017. The Society for the Humanities will not consider applications from scholars who received the Ph.D. after this date. Applicants must also have one or more years of teaching experience, which may include teaching as a graduate student. "


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